Oil Leather Boots, the Easy Way

I’ve found that oiling boots is a chore that keeps getting put off, because people don’t want to go get the stuff needed to do the job, and most methods are time consuming. Well, this method is really fast and easy.

The trick is to use a brush instead of a cloth, and to keep the brush in a pan of oil all the time. The pan is a low cost, like less than $2 new, baking pan. The oil is Neatsfoot oil that I buy by the gallon. It’s a better price that by the quart. The brush is a cheap bristle brush that most people consider disposable. This one has lasted for months immersed in oil, with no sign of falling apart. The aluminum foil is a folded over double layer, this is to keep dust out.

This will extend your boot life, and is wa-a-a-ay easier than anything else I’ve done.

History Pages

I’ll be making pages about East Tn history. I should have done it sooner, because on some of them, they’re a record of a question I asked on social media, and the answers are better than the information I get from online searches. The first one is about Green’s Store, and Green’s Rolling store. I got some really neat replies.

The second page is about why tree trunks were painted white in times past. Some good answers there to, I’ll be looking up how to make lime paint.

The third page is about buildings in the East TN area. Only one picture so far.

I think it was a RR depot

A Cover For The Torch

I use oxy-propane instead of oxy-acetylene for my cutting torch. My shop space is small, so I don’t store it inside. For a few years, I’ve had it under a new plastic trash can, but it looks bad. I finally made a cover for it, from scrounged metal a friend had left over from a job. The winds always blow north or south, so it only needs the side walls. It rained a few hours after I made it, so it’s already been tested.

The ‘pragmatic’ cover
The torch set itself.
Much better.